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Repair or replace your old phone? How to decide

When does it pay to repair your smartphone or tablet versus just buying something brand new?

Apple's new iPhone is getting bigger and better. Samsung's latest flagship phone sports sleek and sexy curves. But just because there are a bunch of new gadgets coming out loaded with all the latest and greatest tech's appeal, it doesn't mean it's smart to get a new device right this second. Even if your current handset is a few years old, has a scratch or two, or boasts the battery life of a sloth, you might be wasting some serious cash by replacing — versus repairing — your smartphone right now.

The screen is cracked - One in 10 people are walking around with cracked smartphones right now. If you like your phone but can't deal with a broken screen check out our cell Phone repair pricing and see how much it will cost to get your gadget back in tip-top shape. Replacing screens should cost around $100. Chances are that's going to be a heck of a lot cheaper than buying a whole new phone, and you can use the money you saved on something you really need… like a case and Tempered Glass that will save your phone from getting cracked again!

Should You Fix That Broken Gadget or Just Buy a New One?

Sometimes fixing a dying laptop, cracked screen, busted motherboard, or blinky game console is almost as pricey as buying a new one. When that happens, you have a pretty tough decision to make: Do you stick with what you’ve been using and love, or get something shiny and new? Here’s what you should consider before making the choice.

It might seem like new tech is always preferable to repairing older gear, but that’s only true if every upgrade is a good one. When we talked abouthow to make this decision when it comes to cars, we noted there’s a lot more to the picture there, and there’s more here too. Let’s tease out some of the things you should think about—depending on your situation, spending some cash to get new might be better than repairing what you have, and in other cases you might be better off fixing what you have.

See If Buying New Is Actually an Upgrade

Remember, not everything “new” is an “upgrade.” It might seem like you’re getting something better by nature, since presumably you’ll get a new, unused item instead of repairing your used gear, but if the thing you’re buying new doesn’t suit you as well as what you have already, it’s not an upgrade. For example, the current-gen Moto X is a great phone, but if you, like many people, preferred the smaller, thinner version compared to the newer, bigger one, you might be unhappy with the upgrade. Sure, it’s technically better, spec-wise, but we all know that whether you enjoy using something comes down to more than specs.

On the other hand, the money you’d spend repairing your old device could go towards getting you something new. Maybe instead of repairing a cracked screen, you can spend a little more and get a newer phone with a better camera, or instead of replacing your laptop’s motherboard you can afford the latest model with more storage and memory than the one you had. Think about that before you make the decision to repair your old device or buy a replacement. If you’re going to spend your money buying new instead of repairing what you use and love, you should make sure you’re actually getting something that’s better for you than what you have.